Categories

Tom Terry, who was a popular and ever-present figure on the English billiards circuit, died at his home in Brinsley, Nottingham, on 1st March 2004. He was 71 years of age and had been suffering from cancer of the colon for some time.

Never amongst the top flight of billiard players, he was nevertheless a useful performer, being a lifelong member of the Bulwell Church Institute, Nottingham, for whom he played as a team member in the local leagues. He also won the Nottingham Amateur Billiards Championship on several occasions and appeared in almost every tournament he was eligible to enter. Probably his best result on the national circuit was to reach the quarter-finals of the English Amateur Championship. He also managed to achieve the target of a double-century break, a rare feat for an amateur player.

He was part of the original group of enthusiasts which formed a committee to save the English Billiards Championship after the collapse of the B&SCC in 1992. This action resulted in the formation of the English Amateur Billiards Association the following year.

A lecturer at Nottingham University, he spent many years writing for Snooker Scene becoming known as the “voice of billiards” and in 1991 he founded his own magazine, The Billiards Quarterly Review, which was devoted to the game. Shortly afterwards, he became more involved in the administrative side when he took over the running of the Mini-Prix Pro-Am billiards tournaments. He was eventually forced by ill-health to reduce his commitment to billiards in 1995, when he also ceased publication of his magazine.

During the preceding twelve years he had attended most of the major billiards events to be held in England, and during that time, either covering for “Snooker Scene,” or for his own magazine, had also been present at every professional event.