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The Billiard Monthly : August, 1912

Jottings of the Month

  • T. Aiken, the Scottish champion, played an exhibition
    game with J. Manson, a local amateur, in the Imperial
    Hotel, North Berwick, Aiken conceding 400 of a start in a
    match of 800 up. The Scottish champion won by 310
    points, the scores being:—Aiken, 800; Mason, 490. Aiken
    gave a capital display, including a very fine break of 339,
    chiefly by top-of-the-table play.
  • The final heat in the Navy and Army annual billiard
    championship was decided at Messrs. Thurston’s, Leicester
    Square, on July 6, when the holder, Private Thomas (1st
    Leicester Regiment) beat Battery Sergeant-Major Wark
    (R.F.A.) by 365 points. In addition to a brilliant break of
    146, the record for the competition, Thomas made runs of
    49, 39, 77, and 29 (twice). Final scores.—Private Thomas,
    1,000; Battery Sergeant-Major Wark, 635.
  • Mr. Thomas Nicholson won the silver amateur championship
    cup at the Lemington Social Club (Newcastle) billiard
    tournament, out of 210 competitors.
  • In Australia, in answer to an interviewer on red ball play,
    Harverson has made the novel suggestion of a small D
    inside the large one, to be used for every 26th stroke. He
    added: “But the game is all right as it is”—an opinion
    with which Diggle agreed.
  • The police have issued an order to prohibit billiard handicaps,
    sweepstakes, raffles, and all forms of gambling for
    money or money’s worth at all licensed houses in the county
    of Flint. The Flint police cannot know much about billiards,
    if they class it, as a matter of chance, with sweepstakes
    and raffles.
  • At the distribution of prizes in connection with the billiard
    and snooker handicaps held under the auspices of the Stock
    Exchange Billiard Association, in addition to the prizes and
    winners, as already announced, a prize was awarded to Mr.
    Arthur Morris for the best break among competitors receiving
    points, viz., 38, and Mr. E. Henderson was awarded
    one for a break of 41 in the list of players owing points.
    Mr. Morris was also presented with a prize for the best
    break in the final of the billiard handicap.
  • At the Constitutional Club at Congleton Mr. Tom Barlow,
    made a break or 245, while playing a game with Mr. S.
    Clare.
  • At the Darlington Junior Unionist Club, on July 17, W.
    Smith, the popular young professional cueist, was the recipient
    of a set of ivory balls and two cues in a case from
    Messrs. Burroughes and Watts to mark his fine performance
    in his match with Newman at the end of last season
    at the Soho Square Salon.
  • As Australian billiards is to the fore just now we may
    mention that the executive of the Victorian Amateur Association
    for 1912 is as follows:—President, Mr. H. D.
    Meakin I.S.O.; vice-presidents, Messrs. Henry Cave, Alexander
    Campbell, James Davies, A. E. Johns, and C. E.
    Joliffe; committee, Messrs. J. C. Dillon, J. Basto, H. R.
    Hamer, C. J. Lane, J. G. Pearson, E. S. Raphael, D.
    Robertson, and Dr. F. S. J. Latham; hon. treasurer, Mr.
    W. McBean; hon. secretary, Mr. J. E. Barlow.
  • Mr. James Samuel Burroughes, of The Homestead, Seaford,
    Sussex, chairman and managing director of Messrs.
    Burroughes and Watts, Ltd., billiard table makers, and who
    died in January last, aged 71, left estate of the gross value
    of £90,050, with net personalty £65,725.
  • The committee of the Billiard Professionals’ Association
    are interesting themselves on behalf of the family of the
    late Mr. Laurie Fraser. Business reverses severely crippled
    Mr. Fraser’s resources during the last three or four years
    of his life, and now his family are in urgent need of financial
    assistance. Subscriptions may be sent to Mr. G. Axtell.
    either to the offices of the Association, 148, Fleet Street,
    E.C, or to his private address, 18, Linom Road, Clapham.
    Meantime an old friend of Laurie’s—Mr. Mark Gilbert—
    is carrying on the business of the deceased at the old address
    —9, Denmark Street, Charing Cross Road, W.C.—for the
    benefit of the family, and of the staff that worked so loyally
    under the late Mr. Fraser.